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2 edition of Characterising the temporal variability of the global carbon cycle found in the catalog.

Characterising the temporal variability of the global carbon cycle

I. G. Enting

Characterising the temporal variability of the global carbon cycle

by I. G. Enting

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Published by CSIRO in Aspendale, Vic .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Atmospheric carbon dioxide -- Measurement.,
  • Carbon cycle (Biochemistry) -- Mathematical models.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementI. G. Enting.
    SeriesCSIRO Atmospheric Research technical paper -- no. 40.
    ContributionsCommonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (Australia). Division of Atmospheric Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination57 p. :
    Number of Pages57
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18188781M
    ISBN 100643063471

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate we describe data sets and methodology to quantify the five major.   The magnitude of global carbon variability is about ±3 PgC, which accounts for only approximately 3% of the estimated anthropogenic uptake of carbon over the past few decades (Khatiwala et al. ; Sabine et al. ; Waugh et al. ). The variability in global heat content on the other hand is about ±3 × 10 22 J.

      The global carbon cycle and water budget of terrestrial ecosystems were estimated in the default simulation, as summarized in Fig. 2. The average WUE C and WUE S of the terrestrial biosphere around were estimated as ± g C kg −1 H 2 O and ± g C kg −1 H 2 O (mean ± standard deviation of interannual variability).   Large variability exists among estimates of terrestrial carbon sequestration, resulting in substantial uncertainty in modeled dynamics of atmospheric CO 2 concentration and predicted future climate change ().The variability in carbon sequestration is partially caused by variation in terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) (), which is the cumulative rate over time of gross plant.

    Global NBP differs markedly among individual models, although the mean value of ± Pg C yr −1 is remarkably close to the mean value of RLS ( ± Pg C yr −1). The interannual variability in modeled NBP is significantly correlated with that of RLS for the period –   Climate-driven variation affects oceanic communities from surface waters to the much-overlooked deep sea and will have impacts on the global carbon cycle. Data from these two widely separated areas of the deep ocean provide compelling evidence that changes in climate can readily influence deep-sea processes.


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Characterising the temporal variability of the global carbon cycle by I. G. Enting Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Enting, I.G. Characterising the temporal variability of the global carbon cycle. Aspendale, Vic.: CSIRO, ©   A number of factors should be considered within any resource assessment, such as power generation, temporal variability within the resource, site conditions (e.g., distance to grid connection), as well as practical and socioeconomic constraints relating to grid infrastructure, governmental strategy on low carbon energy (e.g., the ‘Renewables Cited by:   Corresponding temperature, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide observations are provided in Podstawczynska and Chambers ().

Most pronounced in Fig. 4 was the seasonal cycle of peak Ki ( ≤ Ki ≤ W m −2). Furthermore, mean wind speeds between April and September were notably lower than in the cooler months (heating season).Cited by: 3.

The temporal variability of Zgierz air quality in the non-winter months will be strongly influenced by two main factors: (i) the source strength of emissions (strongly contributed to by the diurnal cycle of traffic density), and (ii) the atmospheric volume into which these emissions mix (i.e.

the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer Cited by: 1. Coccolithophores are a biogeochemically important calcifying group of phytoplankton that exert significant influence on the global carbon cycle. They can modulate the air‐sea flux of CO 2 through the processes of photosynthesis and calcification and, as one of the primary contributors to the oceanic particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) pool Cited by: 1.

Ocean biological processes play an important role in the global carbon cycle via the production of organic matter and its subsequent export. Often, this flux is assumed to be in steady state; however, it is dependent on nutrients introduced to surface waters via multiple mechanisms, some of which are likely to exhibit both intra‐annual and interannual variability leading to comparable.

Satellite-derived monthly time series datasets of rainfall, burned area and active fire detections between December and were used in this study. A map of vegetation types was also used to determine these factors’ spatial and temporal variability and interactions with the total amount of burned area and active fires detected in Colombia.

A global, observation-based assessment of whole-ecosystem carbon turnover times shows that the overall mean global carbon turnover time is about 23 years and that locally its spatial variability. Terrestrial ecosystems play a critical role in the global carbon cycle (Le Quéré et al ).Gross primary productivity (GPP), the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems through plant photosynthesis, is the largest global CO 2 flux (Le Quéré et al ) and the major driver of many ecosystem ore, it is important to understand the spatiotemporal variability of GPP.

The temporal variability of the land carbon is primarily driven by variability in precipitation, surface temperature, and radiation, largely caused by ENSO variability (Zeng et al. Specifically, the observed land carbon sink decreases during warm climate El Niño events and increases during cold climate La Niña and volcanic eruption.

A band‐pass filter is used to obtain an estimate of the seasonal CO2 cycle at Mauna Loa from monthly mean concentration data. The signal that is extracted shows interannual variations in the amplit. Measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide, CO 2, were continuously carried out in the upper Spanish plateau over a three-year campaign, –Temporal CO 2 variations were examined.

The results allow identification of the average data representative of background conditions, ppm, with values ranging from to ppm. The Global Carbon Cycle and Climate Change examines the global carbon cycle and the energy balance of the biosphere, following carbon and energy through increasingly complex levels of metabolism from cells to ecosystems.

Utilizing scientific explanations, analyses of ecosystem functions, extensive references, and cutting-edge examples of energy flow in ecosystems, it is an essential.

A yearly global fire history is a prerequisite for quantifying the contribution of previous fires to the past and present global carbon budget. Vegetation fires can have both direct (combustion) and long‐term indirect effects on the carbon cycle.

Observation‐based estimates of the global carbon budget serve as important constraints on carbon cycle models. We test the effect of new budget data on projection uncertainty. Using a simple global. Atmospheric CO 2 data can provide an integrated, albeit indirect, measure of the global carbon budget, and so it is crucial to understand the causes of spatiotemporal variability in these data.

Characterising the spatial and temporal variability of the tidal-stream energy resource over the northwest European shelf seas Article (PDF Available) in Applied Energy March Chapter Variability and Climate Feedback Mechanisms in Ocean Uptake of CO2 PART IV: The Carbon Cycle of the Land Chapter A Primer on the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: What We Don't Know But Should Chapter Geographic and Temporal Variation of Carbon Exchange by Ecosystems and Their Sensitivity to Environmental Perturbations Chapter The North Atlantic plays a critical role in the global carbon cycle both as a region of substantial air-sea carbon dioxide uptake and as a location for the transfer of CO2 to depth on climatically-important timescales.

While the magnitude of surface fluxes is relatively well constrained, our understanding of the processes that drive variability in ocean-atmosphere exchange and subsequent.

Much of the carbon data collected from ships (bottle measurements and underway pCO 2 systems) and moored platforms have been synthesized into data products. Data products such as the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory surface ocean pCO 2 database (Takahashi et al.

), the Surface Ocean CO 2 Atlas (SOCAT) (Bakker et al. ) and the Global Data Analysis Project (GLODAP). Consequently, there has been growing activity to quantify and understand variability of the carbon cycle based on these longer global-scale records.

The objective of this review is to survey key literature on the variability of the terrestrial carbon cycle at the global scale published over the past 4+. Reporting in Global Biogeochemical Cycles, Laruelle and co-authors 4 now show that the global coastal ocean is a much smaller CO 2 sink than was.

The Global Carbon Cycle edited by Christopher B. Field and Michael R. Raupach is part of the Rapid Assessment Publication series produced by the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), in an effort to quickly disseminate the collective knowledge of the world's leading experts on topics of pressing environmental concern.